7 Common Misconceptions about Extroverts ...

Are you an introvert or an extrovert? We all love to find out more about our personalities, and being able to tag yourself as one or the other can help you to reach your potential and play into your strengths. It might not be as simple as deciding whether you prefer to work alone or in a group, though, or working out if you are drained or energized by other people. Extroverts might seem to be bright, happy and endlessly energetic, but they aren’t always like that. Here are the commonest misconceptions about extroverts! Do you agree?

1. Public Speaking is Easy

Extroverts like attention, right? And they are usually talkative. That doesn’t mean that they enjoy speaking to a crowd, though, and it’s unlikely to mean that they want to present a whole project by themselves. Extroverts are just as likely to dislike public speaking, even if they pull it off, or you think it suits them.

2. They’re Always out

Extroverts like lazy days too. Yes, really. They might be out and about more than introverts, but they still have days when they want to hide under the duvet and watch trashy TV, and they won’t always be up for the cinema/parties/whatever else you want to do. Every personality needs some downtime.

3. They Are Natural Born Organizers

Extroverts rarely seem shy, so it can seem obvious to let them plan group events. From texting people to making plans and co-ordinating diaries, don’t be tempted to leave it all to the extroverts. For one, it can start to feel offensive if people cancel, even if you know that really they are cancelling on the whole group. Secondly, it’s a lot of effort, and sometimes even extroverts want to just be responsible for themselves.

4. They Are Born This Way

Lady Gaga might have been born this way, but most extroverts weren’t. They went through that awkward growing up phase, and they probably had a super shy phase, too. They’ve made a decision, whether actively or passively, to become extroverts; to talk and think and attract attention to themselves, in return for being involved and losing that painful shyness. Just because someone is an extrovert now, doesn’t mean that they always have been, or that they can’t relate to how you feel.

5. They Can’t Be Shamed

Embarrassment happens to us all. Literally. Including extroverts. Extroverts might even be embarrassed more often, as they talk more, and are therefore more likely to put their foot in it. They even lay in bed and cringe thinking about those mortifying things that they said, and instantly knowing five other things that would have been much cooler.

6. They Have Too Many Friends

Extroverts might appear to have lots of friends. Some do have lots of friends. Not all do, though. Being comfortable talking to people doesn’t mean that they can become best buds with anyone, and sometimes, extroverts get lonely too. And if extroverts do have a lot of friends, it doesn’t mean that they value them less, or that they can’t attach to them properly. Pretty much, friendship is the same for everyone. Act like you’d like others to act, and treat people how you’d like to be treated. You’ll always come out on top that way.

7. Life is Easy

This one is a big one. Life isn’t naturally easier for anyone, especially not just because they are an extrovert. There are some things that being an extrovert might make easier – talking to strangers, making difficult phone calls, sticking up for themselves, for example, but there are some things that won’t come easily, too. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that life is easier for other people.

Did any of these change the way that you think about extroverts? One of the best things about being able to identify extroverts and introverts is being able to loosely classify people. If you know someone who is a brilliant extrovert, for example, instead of judging them or making them sort out your social events, get their help with making difficult calls or starting conversations during interviews. You’ll both benefit!